Artists

Emanuel and the Fear

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BIO

It comes with good reason that New York City based orchestral-rock band, Emanuel and the Fear, bestowed the name upon themselves.  After all, the definition of courage is standing up to fear itself, and stand up the 11 of them do, despite the obvious obstacles of playing small stages and the logistics of touring. Through intelligent and complex composition and a penchant for melodic pop, Emanuel and the Fear creates extravagant and climatic electro/orchestral arrangements which ebb and flow around honest and poetic lyrics, delivering a grandeur audible experience relatable to anyone who not only appreciates music, but has ever listened.

With influences that swing as far off as Beethoven, Rachmanicoff and Glass and all the way back to their peers such as Arcade Fire, Bright Eyes, Daft Punk, and Sufjan Stevens, Emanuel and the Fear exploits its relentless talent and eclectic adaptability in a culmination of epic and theatrical proportions with its new album.

Emanuel and the Fear has sequestered themselves for the better part of 2009 to record and build into its first full length master-piece titled ‘Listen’ at Ishlab Music Studios (Jet, Kudu and Dead Perez), due for release with Paper Garden Records on March 9, 2010.  The album was mixed by Patrick Dillett (David Byrne, They Might Be Giants, Mary J Blige) and Mastered by Doug Van Sloun at Focus Mastering (Bright Eyes, Cursive, The Faint, Tokyo Police Club).

Selling out some of NYC’s most well-known venues, headlining several shows at North America’s best music festivals, and gearing up for a full European tour in April, Emanuel and the Fear has gained critical acclaim from the likes of Flavorpill, NME, Fearless Music, RCRD LBL, The L Magazine, and Deli Magazine to name a few. Emanuel and the Fear is one band that will be hard to keep your eyes and ears away from… Listen.

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Press

  • Remember when indie rock was about stripping down and freaking out? The kids in this, 11-piece Brooklyn outfit genial (Emanuel and the Fear) don't: They found their voices in the age of Sufjan and Arcade Fire and (might as well own up to it) the Polyphonic Spree. In their minds, no emotion is too small to warrant the full orchestral-pop treatment. Fortunately, they've got tunes, which always helps the sugar go down.”

    — Village Voice